More Types of Jerky?

When it comes to jerky, most people think of ground beef jerky or wild game jerky. However, the world of beef snacks and jerky is much more expansive. Recipes are available for hot jerky or mild jerky, as well as spicy jerky and gourmet jerky. Additionally, numerous types of meat can be used for making jerky, a list that includes:

Alligator Jerky
Alligator jerky has a wonderful flavor that is often complimented by tasty Cajun spices. Naturally, this exotic jerky is made from alligator meat, which is described as having a flavor similar to both chicken and white fish.

Buffalo Jerky
Buffalo meat is naturally low in fat and cholesterol and is high in protein. Consequently, it is high among the list of Atkins Diet foods. It also makes a terrific jerky that is both nutritious and incredibly rich in flavor.

Chicken Jerky
Chicken is one of the most popular meats in the world due to its great taste and incredible versatility. That versatility extends to the fact that it also makes for a great jerky. As a jerky, chicken becomes brittle and remains quite fibrous.

Crocodile Jerky
Not surprisingly, crocodile jerky is very similar to alligator jerky in both appearance and flavor. Most crocodile meat used for cured jerky purposes originates from Australia and New Zealand.

Deer Jerky
Often referred to as venison jerky, deer jerky is perhaps the ideal game jerky because it is so lean. Deer jerky recipes are numerous and cover a wide range of styles, tastes and marinades.

Elk Jerky
Elk jerky is very similar to deer jerky and, in fact, also falls under the heading of venison jerky. Naturally free of marbled fat, elk meat is a wonderful choice for making jerky.

Emu Jerky
One of the more unknown types of jerky comes from the meat of the emu, a large, flightless, ostrich-like bird from Australia. Emu meat is a red meat that is 97% fat free and packed with protein, iron and vitamin B12. Due to its similarities in taste and texture to lean beef, the standard beef jerky recipe works well with emu meat.

Fish Jerky
Fish jerky is delicious and nutritious, but can be a little trickier to prepare properly than other types of jerky. The fish used, whether it is tuna, salmon, shark or some other fish, needs to be extremely fresh and low in oil content.

Kangaroo Jerky
Kangaroo meat looks and tastes like lean beef. However, it is much lower in fat content and is very popular in Australia. Its texture allows it to absorb spices for maximum flavor, making it a great choice for someone looking for a unique jerky with a distinctive down under appeal.

Ostrich Jerky
Jerky made from ostrich meat is tasty and nutritious. Much more like the meat of cattle than that of other birds, ostrich meat is high in protein, low in fat and rich in potassium, phosphorus and magnesium.

Turkey Jerky
Turkey jerky is gaining in popularity throughout the United States due to its delectable flavor and nutritional benefits. Turkey, like most other poultry, is fibrous in nature, meaning that it can become very brittle if it is not dried correctly. Therefore, it works best when cut into thicker strips.

These are just a few of the many different types of meat that can be used to make delicious jerky. While beef jerky may be the popular choice, there are plenty others that are worthy of the jerky connoisseur's time.
Source: Gary Rangland

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2 Responses to “More Types of Jerky?”

  1. nujabes 3 May 2010 at 3:07 pm Permalink

    Has anyone tried or heard of Nature’s Catch smoked salmon jerky?
    Saw it on amazon the other day and thought I would look into it a little before I actually purchase it.
    Any opinions would be much appreciated. Thx!

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